New data shows global life expectancy will rise by FIVE years by 2015

New data shows global life expectancy will rise by FIVE years by 2015 MailOnline logo

Britain's stark life expectancy divide was today laid bare in an interactive map revealing how your area fares.

Figures show how children born in deprived parts of England, Wales and Northern Ireland could die up to 12 years before youngsters in more affluent districts.

Five years also separates girls and boys born in areas of the country with the lowest average longevity.

It comes as shock research today suggests life expectancy across the world will rise by almost five years by 2050, with men forecast to live to 76 and women, past 80.

This means kids born between 2020 and 2022 in areas such as Blackpool and Manchester are predicted to live shorter lives than the fresh global estimate.

Global average life expectancy is forecast to increase to around 78.1 years of age in 2050, a rise of 4.5 years, The Lancet Public Health study also found.

Experts say the trend is largely driven by public health measures both preventing and improving survival rates from illnesses including cardiovascular disease, nutritional diseases and maternal and neonatal infections.

Commentators today also noted the figures present an 'immense opportunity' to 'get ahead of rising metabolic and dietary risk factors' such as high blood pressure and BMI.

The UK Office for National Statistics (ONS) data shows average life expectancy across the three nations fell to the lowest figure logged in more than a decade.

The estimates are based on period life expectancy, a hypothetical measure that assumes the age-specific mortality rate between 2020 to 2022 applies throughout a person's life.

Calculating male and female rates separately, it uses the death registrations in the period from 2020 to 2022 for each age group, the probability of death and numbers of people surviving in each group.

According to the analysts, boys and girls born in England are expected to live the longest, at 78.9 for men and 82.8 among women.

Wales ranked lowest with 77.9 years for men and 81.8 years with women. In Northern Ireland, the figure stood at 78.4 and 82.3, respectively.

By local authority, a boy born in Hart can expect to reach his 83rd birthday (83.74), the longest male life expectancy recorded.

Meanwhile, one born in Blackpool will likely only live to 73 (73.41), a gap of more than a decade.

Uttlesford in Essex came in second at 82.69, with south Cambridgeshire in third at 82.65.

Meanwhile, a girl born in Kensington and Chelsea should get to 86 (86.34), yet their peers in Blaenau Gwent will likely only live until 78, a gap of 7.5 years.

Among those with the lowest male life expectancy, all ten were in the north of England. Meanwhile, for women eight out of ten were in the north, with two in Wales.

Thedata also covers the period in which Britain was plunged into acost of livingcrisis, which experts have warned increases the risk of malnourishment due to high food and energy prices.

According to The Lancet study, global healthy life expectancy — the average number of years a person can expect to live in good health — will increase from 64.8 years in 2022 to 67.4 years in 2050.

This suggests that while more people are expected to live longer, they are expected to spend more years in poor health.

It found the total number of years lost due to poor health and early death attributable to metabolic risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and high BMI, has increased almost 50 per cent (49.4 per cent) since 2000.

Air pollutants, smoking, and low birthweight and short gestation were among other contributors to lost years of healthy life due to poor health.

The analysis based its estimates on 88 risk factors and their associated health outcomes for 204 countries and territories from 1990 to 2021.

Responding to the figures, Dr Chris Murray, director of the US Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), said: 'In addition to an increase in life expectancy overall, we have found that the disparity in life expectancy across geographies will lessen.

'This is an indicator that while health inequalities between the highest and lowest income regions will remain, the gaps are shrinking, with the biggest increases anticipated in sub-Saharan Africa.

'There is immense opportunity ahead for us to influence the future of global health by getting ahead of these rising metabolic and dietary risk factors, particularly those related to behavioural and lifestyle factors like high blood sugar, high body mass index, and high blood pressure.'

Dr Emmanuela Gakidou, a professor of health metrics sciences at the IHME, added: 'Risk factors that currently lead to ill health, such as obesity and other components of metabolic syndrome, exposure to ambient particulate matter air pollution, and tobacco use, must be addressed via a combination of global health policy efforts and exposure reduction to mitigate health risks and improve population health.'

Read more
  • https://www.msn.com/en-sg/news/other/new-data-shows-global-life-expectancy-will-rise-by-five-years-by-2015/ar-BB1mzNOG

Related

NUS, NTU, SMU attribute dormitory fee hike to rising costs

NUS, NTU, SMU attribute dormitory fee hike to rising costs

News
Six Electric Sedans Were Driven Until They Died. The Results Are Fascinating

Six Electric Sedans Were Driven Until They Died. The Results Are Fascinating

News
Everything Fans Need To Know About The Big Bang Theory

Everything Fans Need To Know About The Big Bang Theory

News
Not so bird-brained after all! Crows can count 'out loud' like humans

Not so bird-brained after all! Crows can count 'out loud' like humans

News
Photos Of The Last Remaining Uncontacted Tribes On Earth

Photos Of The Last Remaining Uncontacted Tribes On Earth

News
How Pixar Became Our Favorite Animation Studio

How Pixar Became Our Favorite Animation Studio

News
UFO mystery may be result of advanced 'stealth civilization' on Earth

UFO mystery may be result of advanced 'stealth civilization' on Earth

News
Scientists spot mysterious object at the center of our Milky Way

Scientists spot mysterious object at the center of our Milky Way

News