More Maps That Help You Understand The World

More Maps That Help You Understand The World
Guys, I don't even know how to introduce these anymore. I just found really cool maps that give us interesting information about the world. So here they are, starting with the two on the thumbnail. First, we have a map for the average annual tea consumption per capita in Europe. Essentially, as we can see on the bar on the left, the darker the color, the more tea each country consumes. The darkest purple means on average that country would consume 4 kilograms of tea per person. The map stretches a little into North Africa and the Middle East as well, and thankfully so because apparently these are very high tea consuming countries. Turkey seems to rank first, followed by the UK and Ireland, then comes Russia and Iran, and then Morocco, Egypt and Poland. Germany, the Netherlands, Ukraine, Czechia and Switzerland follow, and then the rest of Europe with available data is in the yellow, meaning they consume probably less than one kilogram of tea per person per year. The least tea consuming seem to be Greece, Denmark, Belgium and Portugal. I personally like tea a lot, and tea seems to be a big thing here, so I don't know, maybe these aren't very accurate. A good moment to remind you to always look at these maps and data with critical thinking. Don't just assume it's right because it's presented nicely and widely distributed online. The second map on the thumbnail is about each US state's contribution to the GDP. Essentially, which states generate the most money through their bigger economies? This is referring to the third quarter of the year of 2019. So keep in mind that data may have changed and this is only referred to the last quarter of a year, but I think the tendency might be representative. As we can see on the scale above, the darker the color, the more that state contributes to the USGDP. The top contributors are California by far the number one with 14.6%, followed by Texas and then New York 8.8% and 8.1 respectively. The green range is kind of too large compared to the others, and within it we have have four more states that are far below Texas or New York but above the rest. Florida at 5.1, Illinois at 4.2, Pennsylvania at 3.8% and Ohio at 3.30. In Washington too, although I don't have the number for that, we can clearly tell that the coast or the richest, although the Northeast not so much. The interior of the US contributes only between 0.2 to 1% of the total GDP per state, with a couple exceptions in light green here and there. This next map is really interesting and it shows us the influence that the Roman Empire still has on countries today. It lists out seven attributes that were used during Roman times, the Gregorian calendar, the Latin alphabet, Catholic religion, a Roman like legal system, the usage of romantic languages, a type of Roman governance, republics, and if they are within the historic borders of Rome. Now all this is highly questionable from my perspective. Catholicism wasn't invented by the Roman despite them contributing a lot to its expansion. Republics weren't invented by the Romans either. In fact, the Roman Republic was only a part of Roman existence before they became an empire, amongst many things. So I wouldn't see these attributes as being inheritances we have from the Romans, but more things about our states today that are similar to what the Romans also had. Still, it's interesting to see the darker the red, the more attributes the country shares with the Romans. We can see southern Europe, southern America and West Africa are the most similar within these attributes Southern Europe because of the direct historical connection with the empire. Southern America as the grandsons of the Romans, if you will, since their states are highly influenced by Portugal and Spain and West Africa. I think following a similar logic. Next, this map shows us writing direction by country. It's very interesting. The vast, vast majority of the world in blue rides from left to right, even if sometimes using different alphabets. The Arab world, and not entirely but in great majority, writes from the right to the left. And only a few countries in Asia, as far as I can tell, China, Mongolia, the Koreas and Japan. Right from left to right or top to bottom. Within these differences, it's interesting that we always write in perpendicular form, if that makes sense. I mean, nobody writes diagonally, for instance, and nobody writes in a circle or with a seemingly random arrangement of letters. It's fascinating how these cultures, so different from each other, although perhaps sharing common origins, all end up writing in such similar ways. This other map connects Europe to the United States. It's not very graphically pleasing to look at the colors the map orders and the fonts are not ideal, but the information seems interesting if it is accurate. In each European country we see represented AUS state. That US state is the one where that country has the highest percentage of population. Now this doesn't mean that the majority of people in Maine have French ancestry. What it means is that Maine is the US state in which the percentage of people with French ancestry is the highest when compared to other states. It's interesting to see how some trends exist and how countries share U.S. states as the preferred destination for their people. Portugal and Italy both have Rhode Island, the UK and Denmark, Utah, Germany, Norway and Iceland, North Dakota, Spain, New Mexico, Hungary and Slovenia. Both Ohio, Russia and Belarus. New York. Now obviously this data might be completely wrong. Keep that in mind. I look at this and think how is Wisconsin the state with the highest percentage of Polish people? But we have to take into account population number totals of the states as well. Maybe there are more Polish people in New York than in Wisconsin, but a smaller number might represent a higher percentage of the population if Wisconsin has less people than New York. Still, in Europe we have this great map, honestly my favorite of this list, depicting the oldest still functioning universities in Europe. If you want me to make a full video on this, I'd love to discussing the origin of these ancient medieval schools, so let me know in the comments if you'd like to see that. The darker the green the oldest the university. The oldest of all seems to be Bologna, followed by Salamanca, Oxford, Sarbon, Coimbra and Vienna, Italy, Spain, England, France, Portugal and Austria respectively. In this orange or pink we have those which are much more recent, and the most recent of all seems to be Luxembourg University from 2003. Next we have a paper sizes world map showing us the most commonly used paper size by country. Almost the entire world uses a four measurements, but a few countries, for whatever reason, use a slightly different one. Chile, Venezuela, Colombia, Mexico, the United States, Canada, the Philippines, and some others in Central America use the US letter size instead. I don't get why this is the case, especially in a more and more international context in which each country exists, but I guess it works for them. I even found an opinion when I looked this up saying that the shorter aspect ratio lets you fit more text, graphics, and reasonably oriented material onto a sheet of paper, and this would make US letters better for letters, academic papers, and engineering drawings. Now I have no idea if this is true, but if so, maybe we're the ones who are wrong. Using a four. This other map is also worldwide and presents us with a general idea of lactose intolerance throughout the world. Although it presents it in the opposite way, showing the percentage of people that are tolerant to lactose. According to this most of the world. Although I just noticed the map is missing. The entire continent of America would be kind of lactose intolerant, with only small parts of Arabia, West Africa, and especially Northern Europe being extremely tolerant to lactose. I think the dots on the maps or where they conducted research again always questioned the veracity of this data, but it is interesting that so much of the world would not be entirely tolerant to lactose. Since this last map missed America, let's go to a map about a southern American country, Brazil. This map shows us the dominant ancestry groups in each Brazilian state, essentially the opposite of that map we saw for Europe. Here each state shows us what the biggest ancestry group is within it. Most of them are Portuguese, which makes sense since the country used to be a Portuguese colony, but there are also five states of indigenous and or African descent. The second biggest ethnicity is Italian, followed by Spanish. Germans also occupy a big amount, although only being in the majority in one state in the South. And surprisingly, people of Lebanese ancestry are, according to this, very common in Brazil, although not being the biggest group in any state. Next, we're back to a worldwide map depicting the most commonly used electrical outlets. Now the legend for this map is a little confusing. It has 13 different types of outlets, but then they are color-coded in groups. I honestly don't fully understand the point of grouping them up. Maybe it's because those with the same color, despite being different or compatible. If so, we can see that most of the world uses outlets of the light blue type. North America, Central and northern South America use those of the orange type, as does Japan, Taiwan, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Argentina, and a part of China use the dark blue types. India, South Africa, Namibia and Sri Lanka use the pink type, and the UK and a lot of its former colonies in Africa, as well as Burma and Malaysia use the purple type. This is something that is so annoying, although I imagine there's some logical explanation for it. But why doesn't the entire world just have one common, or at least fully compatible modes of electrical outlets? And finally, to end this video, a map of Australia showing us in which areas we can naturally find a platypus, which is completely pointless to this video, but a platypus is a cool animal, so do what you will with this incredibly useful information. This was the 2nd video of these kind of statistical maps that I made and I still have a bunch of other cool maps saved which I think you might appreciate seeing. So if you want more maps that explain the world, just leave a like or a comment or whatever you want. Essentially if the video does well, I will make more of these. Thanks so much for watching this video. Subscribe if you want and I will see you next time for more general knowledge.
  • https://www.msn.com/en-xl/news/other/more-maps-that-help-you-understand-the-world/vi-BB1pebCq?ocid=00000000

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