I'm a skin specialist - here are three treatments I would never get

I'm a skin specialist - here are three treatments I would never get I'm a skin specialist - here are three treatments I would never get

A skincare specialist has issued a warning about the dangers of popular beauty treatments trending on social media and claims they are simply not worth the fuss - for your skin or your wallet.

Antonia Macdonald, 32, from Edinburgh, is a qualified medical aesthetics practitioner with nearly a decade of experience.

In a reel that has amassed over 4.5 million views on her Instagram account, @antonialouiseskin, the expert cautions against three hot trends.

Antonia argues that these treatments are not only ineffective but potentially harmful, while claiming they are more about marketing than genuine skincare benefits.

She said: 'If it sounds too good to be true and costs more than your monthly mortgage, it is most likely not worth it.

She added: 'Unfortunately, we live in a day where the aesthetic industry has become toxic. There are a lot of medical spas out for a quick buck over taking care of what patients actually need.'

'Do I get hate from professionals in the field selling such treatments? Yes of course but I sleep much better at night knowing I don't recommend anything unless I'd get the treatment personally and carry out the treatment on a family member.'

Here, Antonia reveals the three skincare trends she advises against and why.

Hydrafacials

The first popular trend Macdonald critiques is hydrafacials, which involves saturating the skin's surface with antioxidants and peptides to maximise its glow.

But the treatment is described as 'over-stripping' and 'over-exfoliating' the skin, according to the expert.

She said: 'There's a common misconception that you need to get a 'deep clean' once a month when this couldn't be further from the truth. Your skin actually turns over and naturally exfoliates itself.

She added: 'With minimal and correct skincare at home, most patients can achieve healthy skin with ingredients to help target the pore-cleaning process. It's another treatment preying on women's insecurities.'

Microneedling

The second treatment Macdonald advises against is microneedling, which has taken social media by storm over recent years.

The procedure involves pricking the skin with tiny sterilised needles, with the resulting small wounds said to encourage your body to make more collagen and elastin, which heals the skin and helps you look younger.

Although there is some scientific evidence suggesting that microneedling can boost collagen and help with acne scars, fine lines, and wrinkles, the skincare specialist remains sceptical.

Macdonald noted: 'Many patients are left underwhelmed and out of pocket.

'The trauma caused by microneedling can lead to broken capillaries, infection dermatitis, and worsening of inflammatory skin conditions like rosacea, acne, and hyperpigmentation.'

Face Yoga

Face yoga, touted by some as a non-invasive way to achieve a facelift, is the third beauty treatment on Macdonald's no-no list.

She argues that face yoga exercises facial muscles when the goal should be to relax them in order to minimise wrinkles.

She explained: 'Face yoga has exploded in the aesthetic industry over the last few years, again mainly due to 'gurus' on social media claiming to give you a facelift with their hands and diminish wrinkles.

'But scientifically, it does not make sense. This is why we inject the muscles with neuromodulators [such as Botox],' the skin specialist said, who alternatively recommends simple facial massages at no extra cost.

Other treatments to avoid, according to Antonia

Other treatments Macdonald advises against include PDO thread lifts, non-surgical rhinoplasty, and cool sculpting 'fat freezing.'

Social media users have been left stunned by Antonia's advice - while some strongly disagree.

One person wrote: 'Nah, microneedling has literally removed lines from under my eyes!' while another insisted: 'Must disagree on microneedling. It works wonders if you commit to it.'

A third said: 'Face Yoga has absolutely helped to lift and tone my face.'

However, a number of people agreed with Macdonald's advice, with one writing: 'Amen ! Hydrafacial is lazy skincare, also over-priced and not eco friendly with plastic consumables.'

Another user wrote: 'Yes I had the same experience with hydrafacial. My good skin got bad. I had red bumps and irritation for days, never again.'

'Absolutely found the hydra-facial useless,' commented one disappointed user.

Read more
  • https://www.msn.com/en-my/health/other/i-m-a-skin-specialist-here-are-three-treatments-i-would-never-get/ar-BB1nwO7i?ocid=00000000

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